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Design Tools to Help You Create Your Next Project- Part 1

                              Creating a well-designed site, product, or project usually isn’t cheap. You know you want to make something that looks good–but how do you do it if you’re working with a limited budget? While there’s no substitute for hiring a great designer, there are ways to build something beautiful without spending thousands of dollars—and it starts with the little elements, like getting the font, icons, photos, and colors right.


Stock Photography

Stock photos and videos are notoriously expensive. While they are super important for making your website, presentations, pitch decks, and sales materials look sharp, few startups can afford to spend hundreds of dollars on a limited license image.
If you’ve found yourself in this predicament before, here are a handful of sites with free (or cheap) stock photos that are actually captivating and don’t look like you just pulled them from a 90s business brochure

Pexels


All photos on Pexels are free for personal and commerical use under a Creative Commons Zero (CC0) license. They currently have 30,000+ stock photos on the site, and add around 3,00 new images each month.



Upsplash was originally a side project started by the Crew team. It literally saved the company when it was a few weeks away from dying. Now, its a standalone site, with new high-quality images popping up daily.



The Stock Up site features 15,000+ indexed photos from over 30 different stock photography websites, like Life of Pix and Splitshire. Most of the photos fall under the Creative Commons Zero (CC0) license, but always refer to the original image for details about the specific license before use.


On Coverr, you’ll find beautiful, free videos for your homepage. Just download your favorite one, upload it to your website, and add the corresponding snippet of code to your site. Every Monday, you’ll find seven new videos on the site


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